How to tell if Your Pet Bird is Sick

The practice of keeping a pet bird has been around for centuries. People the world over have brought birds into their homes to enjoy their lovely colors or perhaps, as with canaries, to revel in their beautiful songs or maybe just for companionship.  We humans have benefited from birds in many ways. The key as an owner is to make sure our birds benefit as well.

Pet Bird ownership can be quite challenging. They can suffer from boredom, too little or too much food. Maybe it’s just the wrong foods. They are affected by stress, loneliness, allergies, arthritis, injuries, respiratory problems and more. The list is almost endless. On top of that, birds often mask their illnesses and often, by the time we notice things aren’t right, they are already very sick. New owners quickly learn that caring for a pet bird is not as easy as it seemed at first glance.

Below is a list of signs indicating that you need to call your veterinarian:

  • Huddled

  • Sitting low on the perch

  • Sitting on the bottom of the cage

  • Hanging onto the side of the cage with his beak instead of sitting on a perch

  • Head tucked under wing and standing on two feet

  • Puffed up feathers (consistently)

  • Weakness

  • Losing balance, teetering, or falling off of perch

  • Lumps or swelling of any portion of the body

  • Picking at his feathers or body

  • Trembling

  • Not preening

  • Harassed by other birds

  • Eyes dull, sunken, or abnormal color

  • Walking in circles

  • Unusual smell  or change of color or consistency of bird or droppings

  • Drooped or elevated wing(s)

  • Not eating or eating much less

  • decreased singing/talking

  • less interested in interaction with you

  • Discharge from eyes or nares ( nostrils)

  • Change in the appearance of the beak

  • Squinting of eyes

  • Bloody stool or blood anywhere

 

 

Why is My Cat Drooling?

To explain any number of the great mysteries of the universe, one has to conduct extensive research and amass endless observations. Scientists have uncovered possible truths about the Easter island statues, dark matter, the lost city of Atlantis, and other fabulous head-scratchers. Among the list of unsolved enigmas is a very important topic for us: cat drooling. From the serious to the silly, this feline behavior can be explained through a variety of factors, and we’re happy to share them with you!

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Handling Hepatic Harm: An Owner’s Guide to Pet Liver Problems

The liver may not be the most glamorous internal organ, but as far as function goes, it is the workhorse of the body. Having a happy liver is vital to good health. Unfortunately, liver issues are not uncommon to find in our pet patients. Animal Family Veterinary Care Center wants all of our pet parents to understand why the liver is so important and what to expect when we find pet liver problems.

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The Good, the Bad, and the Effective: What Works When it Comes to Pet Dental Care

Gone are the days when we used to throw Spot a bone and assume that keeps his canines in good shape. We now know that dental neglect can lead to systemic infections and many of the same problems you might see in people, such as heart, lung, and kidney disease.

Pet dental care is one of the most overlooked forms of care when it comes to our four-legged friends. The team at Animal Family Veterinary Care Center want to emphasize the importance of oral health and help you establish a good dental care routine for your furry little friend.

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Laser Therapy for Pets: Not Just for Dr. Evil

Veterinarian laser therapyIf you can’t say the word “laser” without making the quotation gesture, you aren’t alone. The word itself evokes thoughts of science fiction and futuristic capabilities.

Animal Family Veterinary Care Center is happy to let you know that laser therapy is part of real life here at our hospital. Laser therapy for pets is becoming more and more common and isn’t scary at all. Who knows, maybe you have a pet who could benefit?

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Pancreatitis – Unhappy holidays.

A pug shows her teeth for the camera in this comical pose.

 

The holiday season is here. We love all the yummy foods that are part of the celebration . Our pets love them too. Unfortunately,  all those goodies can also cause pancreatitis.

Pancreatitis is commonly seen in both dogs and cats. It  can occur in either an acute (rapid onset) or chronic (slow and subtle) form.   Although small in size, the pancreas can cause serious illness. It is very sensitive and if irritated,  becomes swollen,  inflamed and painful.

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A Full Plate: Thanksgiving Pet Safety Tips to Make You Really Thankful

Begging for the Holiday FeastYour pet is a member of your family, so of course you want to spend Thanksgiving together. However, with all there is to do, your furry friend could find trouble in the most unexpected ways. That’s why we offer some of our best tips to complete your Thanksgiving pet safety checklist. Now you can sit back, relax, and enjoy all the season has to offer.

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Kennel Cough

coughing dog
It’s fall. Besides the changing colors and cooler weather, Kennel Cough is another thing we expect to rear its ugly head every fall.

What is Kennel Cough?

  Kennel Cough is the common name for Canine Infectious Respiratory Disease Complex (CIRDC). It is seen in dogs in group situations such as kenneling, grooming, dog shows, dog parks etc. The symptoms include hacking, coughing, sneezing and retching.

 So, what causes Kennel Cough then?

 CIRDC can be caused by the following bugs:
 Virus: Bocavirus, Canine Adenovirus Type 2, Canine Corona Virus, Canine Distemper Virus, Canine Herpes Virus, Canine Influenza Parainfluenza, Pneumovirus and Reovirus.
 Bacteria: Bordetella Brochiseptica, Streptococcus Equi, Mycoplasma spp. and secondary bacterial infections.

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Why Obesity in Pets Can Take a Toll on Their Health

Fat CatWe hear a lot about the obesity epidemic and all the health problems associated with a sedentary lifestyle. The same epidemic is happening with our pets. An estimated 58% of cats and 53% of dogs are overweight or obese.

As we continue to learn how this impacts the health of our four-legged friends, the old idea of a cute fat cat or pudgy pug can be detrimental. Obesity in pets is a serious concern that can lead to diabetes, heart disease, kidney disease, and liver problems. Continue…