Christmas Hazards That Can Harm Your Pet

 

 

 

 

1)   Potpourri:    Liquid potpourri can make your home smell festive for the holidays but remember to keep it away from your pets.  If the worst happens and your pet swallows liquid potpourri or spills any of it on themselves, you may see some of the following: drooling in case of ingestion, burning of the skin or mouth, weakness and vomiting. If you think any potpourri may be left on your pet’s skin, bathe them ASAP and call your veterinarian.

2)   Oh Christmas Tree:  As beautiful as Christmas trees are, they can pose considerable danger to your pets.  Don’t make this the Christmas you remember because of the trip to the emergency room. Be sure to secure your tree properly so playful pets don’t topple it and injure themselves. 

3)   Ornaments:  Cats love to play with tinsel but it can be a deadly game.  If ingested tinsel can cause a linear foreign body capable of cutting through intestines. Signs may include loss of appetite, lethargy and vomiting. Notify your veterinarian immediately if you think your cat has eaten any tinsel.  Ornament hooks can also be a hazard.  They are easily swallowed by pets and can lodge in the stomach or intestines.  Even broken ornaments knocked from the tree can cut sensitive paw pads. In general, it is best not place ornaments low on the tree where pets can dislodge them. 

4)   Electrical Cords: All kinds of pets are susceptible to allure of chewing electrical cords. Once they come into contact with bare wire,  they can die suddenly or receive severe burns to the mouth.  Signs of electrical burns include drooling, blisters and swelling around the mouth and an unwillingness or inability to eat or drink.  This type of injury requires immediate veterinary care.

5)   Poinsettias/Mistletoe:    Both these plants are commonly used as decorative accents during the Holiday season.  Poinsettia can cause local irritation to the mouth, gums and GI tract if ingested.  Treat your pet by washing the sap off immediately to stop further irritation. If your pet is  vomiting or if their eyes appear inflamed, call your veterinarian  It is the berries of the Mistletoe that pose a danger to pets.  Depending on the amount ingested, symptoms can range from GI upset and vomiting to drooling, diarrhea, increased urination, and rapid heart rate and respiration.  All of these symptoms require immediate veterinary care. 

6)   Alcohol:   Are there still people who think it is funny to feed pets alcohol?  Sadly the answer is yes.  It really doesn’t matter whether toxicity occurs by accident or intent; it is important to understand that pets can die from alcohol ingestion.  Alcohol poisoning is dependent on the amount of alcohol ingested as compared to an animal’s weight. That means when a small pet gets into an alcoholic beverage, it can cause a significant toxicity problem. According to Becky Lundgren, DVM, “Within 15 to 30 minutes after the pet has drunk the alcohol on an empty stomach (or within 1 to 2 hours on a full stomach); central nervous system signs (such as staggering, excitement, or decreased reflexes) can begin. Behavioral changes can be seen, as can an increased need to urinate. As the problem gets worse, the pet may become depressed, have a slow respiratory rate, or go into cardiac arrest. Puppies and kittens are at particular risk because of their small size and immature organ systems.”

7)   Chocolate:  Most people are aware that chocolate is bad for pets.  We just need to be extra careful to keep it away from them during the holidays.  As with most toxicities, problems with chocolate vary depending on the amount of cocoa, the size of the animal and the total amount ingested.  Again, a small pet that eats dark chocolate can be expected to have a much more severe problem.  Signs of toxicity include increased excitability, increased irritability, increased heart rate, restlessness, increased urination, muscle tremors, vomiting and diarrhea.  Be sure to call your veterinarian immediately if you think your pet may have ingested chocolate.

8)   Grapes/Raisins:   Lots of Holiday breads and treats contain raisins or grapes. We love them but accidental ingestion by our pets can cause kidney problems.  If you suspect your pet may have ingested either call your veterinarian ASAP.

9)   Burning Candles:  This hazard doesn’t need a lot of explanation.  We all just need to remember to take extra care that candles are safely out of the way of rambunctious pets and children. 

10)  Overindulgence:   As tempting as it may be, please don’t share your holiday bounty with your petsToo much fatty food can cause a bout of pancreatitis (an inflammation of the pancreas caused by over secretion of the enzymes used to digest food) and land your pet in the emergency room.  Signs of pancreatitis include: vomiting, no or decreased appetite, an abdomen that is painful to the touch and/or a hunched appearance, fever, diarrhea, lethargy /depression, and dehydration.  Pancreatitis can be life threatening and requires immediate veterinary care. 

So, please enjoy the holidays but remember keep a watchful eye on your pet as well.

   ASPCA Poison Control:   888-426-4435       

   http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/poison-control

Finding the Right Dental Care for Your Pet

 

Dear Doctor Rob:

Why is there so much difference from clinic to clinic when it comes to dental procedures?  I want to do the best thing for my pet but frankly, I am confused.  Could you please help me understand what is involved in a dental procedure?

Confused Pet Owner

Dear confused:

Making comparisons about any procedure at a veterinary clinic (or for that matter at a dentist office, with a plumber, mechanic, lawyer, etc.) can be a bit tricky.   Are apples being compared with apples?  Any other way is just not fair.

A dental cleaning means different things to different people and there is a huge difference between removing tartar from the crown of the tooth and a complete oral exam with cleaning, polishing, charting and oral surgery if needed.

As much as we promote dental home care to prevent disease, the fact is that most of what we do is not a simple cleaning.  Most patients have dental disease that needs to be addressed, safely, under anesthesia, while on IV fluids, with monitoring.  Sometimes this also includes dental x-rays, deeper pocket cleaning and even oral surgery.

So questions need to be asked.  Do these estimates or procedures include:

Does your veterinarian provide pre-surgical bloodwork to evaluate liver and kidney function?  That is the only way to tailor anesthesia to your pet’s health requirements.   Will there be intravenous fluids to support blood pressure and help blood flow to the kidneys and other organs?  Will your pet be under general anesthesia with intubation to provide a secure source of oxygen and to protect the airway from aspiration of water and bacteria ? Does the veterinarian have trained staff monitoring your pet while he or she  under anesthesia? Are pain medications provided before the procedure? Do they use local nerve blocks to protect your pet from pain during the procedure?  This would be similar to the lidocaine you receive at your dentist.  Does the practice provide pain medications if required after the procedure?  Do they scale above and below the gumline or just clean what you can see?  What type of scaling do they use?  Is it hand scaling or ultrasonic ? Do they make certain to polish your pet’s teeth after scaling?  If not,  they are simply providing a new surface for tartar to attach to the teeth.  Do they probe the gumline for pockets and then chart their findings?  If they find a potential problem do they have the ability to do digital dental x-rays?  Do they have the tools and training to perform safe surgical extractions, if needed?  That includes closure of the surgery (extraction) sites.  Does your pet receive antibiotics before and after the procedure if  needed?  Will there be detailed home care recommendations and recheck exams?  Are extractions recommended appropriately or only when teeth are just about to fall out on their own?   Are root planing and subgingival curettage offered?  Is there a licensed veterinary technician assisting the veterinarian?  Has the veterinarian and staff received continuing education from a board certified veterinary dentist?

If the answers to all of these questions are the same, then fair statements can be made.    We are proud of the services we offer and the job that we do.  There are no standards mandated in veterinary medicine that every clinic must abide by, therefore no two clinics are the same. This is part of the reason we follow American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) standards and are AAHA certified

I hope this has helped make things a little less confusing for you.  If you still have questions, feel free to call the clinic or visit our website at www.animalfamilyveterinarycare.com