How to Keep Your Pet Exercised in the Winter Months

AAHA Pets’ Matter is a great source of information on pet health.  This week we’d like to share their tips for keeping your dog healthy and active in the winter months.  Just click on the link below.

AAHA Pet’s Matter

Have a wonderful and safe New Year!

10 Reasons Why Your New Pet Should Come From a Shelter

 

 Many families choose to add a new furry family member to their home at Christmas.  Sadly when we think of a new pet most of us only think of puppies or kittens.    It’s easy to do. Who doesn’t love a puppy and babies are wonderful and cuddly.

However, this holiday season, we at  Animal family would like to suggest youbring home a shelter baby.  For those of you with room in your heart but not in your home, please consider a donation of time, money, bedding or whatever you can spare.  Most of our shelters are over crowded and stretched financially.

So we’ve said it before and once again, here are 10 good reasons your next pet should come from a shelter.

You know what you are getting. Unlike a puppy, if you adopt an adult animal, he/she will already have a fully developed personality.  In addition, most shelters temperament test their animals before putting them up for adoption so there is little chance of bringing home an unstable animal. 

  1. Some animals receive extra training and socialization.  How great is it to get a pet that is already house trained!  Even better, if you adopt through an agency that utilizes foster care, your pet may have received some basic obedience training as well.  Shelters will generally be willing to help you should problems develop post adoption.
  2. Your new companion wants and appreciates the chance to bond with you. Ending up in a shelter is a scary process.  Pets may arrive there due to the death of a previous owner, financial difficulties, or simply because they got lost.  These are usually great animals who just need a second chance and will be forever grateful to their new owner.
  3. Shelters are a better option than a puppy mill.  You have no idea about the breeding, or socialization of animals that come from a puppy mill. You may pay a large amount of money for a pet that has spent its entire life in a small kennel with little human contact.  When profit is the main motivator, you can be sure that little attention is paid to preventing inherited disorders either
  4. You are saving lives.  When you adopt a pet from a shelter you are not only saving the pet you bring home but making room for another animal in that facility or foster program as well.  It feels pretty good to save one life but it’s even better when it’s two.
  5. You are helping your community.  When you adopt from your local humane society the fees you pay help to fund all of their programs. Most shelters also provide community education, patrol for strays and lost pets and ensure animals they adopt out are spayed or neutered.  
  6. You will have help finding the right animal for your family.  Shelters want their placements to work and they will work hard to help you find the right animal for your home environment.  Unlike buying from a pet store, you get to know ahead of time if your dog or cats prefers children or other pets.
  7. Yes, you can find a purebred animal.  A surprising number of purebred dogs and cats can be found at your local humane society.  Being a purebred does not make them immune from circumstances that can land them in a shelter.
  8. Shelters also have puppies and kittens.  If you really love having a baby in the house, shelters usually have young animals up for adoption too. They can also be a great place to find your next rabbit, guinea pig or ferret.

10. Your pet may already be spayed or neutered.  Because all shelters are concerned about pet overpopulation, your pet will most likely already be altered. If you adopt an animal that is too young most provide vouchers for later spaying and neutering.  That’s one less thing for you to worry about.

If you’re loving these pictures,  please be sure to click on their photo.  They are all adoptable pets  from some of our wonderful shelter and rescue organizations.  The link will take you directly to the shelter page.

How Do I know if My Bird is Sick?

 

The practice of keeping birds has been around for centuries.  People the world over have brought birds into their homes to enjoy their lovely colors or perhaps, as with canaries, to revel in their beautiful songs or  maybe just for companionship. We humans have benefited from birds in many ways. The key as an owner is to make sure our birds benefit as well.

Bird ownership can be quite challenging.  Captive birds can suffer from boredom, too little or too much food. Maybe it’s just the wrong foods. They are affected by stress, loneliness, allergies, arthritis, injuries, respiratory problems and more.  The list is almost endless. On top of that, birds often mask their illnesses and often, by the time we notice things aren’t right, they are already very sick.  New owners quickly learn that caring for a bird is not as easy as it seemed at first glance.

Below is a list of signs indicating that you need to call your veterinarian:

  • Your bird has its feathers fluffed most of the time and may be sitting on the cage floor.
  • Your bird appears sleepy and uninterested in usual activities.
  • Your bird has discharge from the eyes, nostrils or debris stuck to the beak.
  • Your usually vocal bird has stopped singing or talking.
  • Your bird is not using his legs or wings normally.
  • Your bird keeps falling off its perch.
  • Your bird is eating less or no food.
  • Your bird appears to be bobbing on the perch.  This can be a sign of respiratory distress.
  • You have noticed a change in the consistency of your birds stool or you see caked feces near the vent.
  • You have seen your bird regurgitate food or think you have seen regurgitated food on the bottom of the cage.
  • Your bird is picking feathers from its body.  This can be a sign of mites but can also be behavioral.
  • Your bird has a head tilt..
  • The keel bone on your bird’s chest has become more prominent. 
  • Your bird’s beak has become overgrown. 
  • Your bird has thickened areas that may or may not be raw on the bottom of its feet.
  • Your bird has swelling around the lower leg. This can be a sign of gout.
  • Your bird has tremors or even seizures.
  • Your bird is bleeding.  Birds can damage blood feathers and most are ill equipped to deal with much blood loss. 

These are not all inclusive but are some of the main signs of illness require veterinary care.