Ticks and Fleas and Creepy Crawlers!!!!

 

The world is full of creepy, crawly bugs.  They all have a purpose in the eco-system but unfortunately some of them are not so good for our pets.  Below is some more information on one of the more important ones.

 

Although ticks are commonly thought of as insects, they are actually arachnids like scorpions, spiders and mites. Ticks have four pairs of legs as adults and have no antennae.  Ticks are also efficient carriers of disease because they attach firmly when sucking blood, feed slowly and may go unnoticed for a considerable time while feeding. Ticks can take several days to complete feeding.

Ticks can also carry a variety of diseases that can cause problems in our 4 legged friends. One of the most common diseases present in our area from tick attachment and feeding is Lyme Disease.

 

Lyme disease

An infected Ixodes tick (deer tick) transmits the Borrelia burgdorferi bacteria through the skin when it bites. Most dogs (as well as people) do not even feel the bite, which is why the tick can remain undiscovered.  After the initial bite through the skin, the tick secretes “cement” to anchor to its host where it is difficult to remove. Then, it begins to take in its blood meal 30 minutes later.

 

Amazingly, unlike most other insect bites, the tick’s bite is painless and non-irritating because its saliva contains:
– An anesthetic to numb and reduce pain
– An antihistamine to reduce allergic reaction or itching
– An anticoagulant to enhance blood flow
– An anti-inflammatory to reduce swelling
– An immunosuppressant to help aid in the transmission of pathogens

 

INFECTION DOES NOT HAPPEN IMMEDIATELY

The deer tick is very slow in transmitting the bacteria to dogs – only after the tick is partially engorged – 24 to 48 hours after attaching to the dog. This slow transmission of the disease shows the importance of checking your dog for ticks after being outside, even in your own backyard.

 

Dogs become infected with Lyme disease from the bite of an infected Ixodes tick called “the deer tick.” The tick must be infected with a specific bacterium called Borrelia burgdorferi for your dog to get canine Lyme disease. This bacteria is what actually causes canine Lyme disease – the tick is just the transmitter or “vector” for the bacteria.  Dogs don’t get Lyme disease from other dogs or people. Dogs can get Lyme disease anywhere there are infected ticks, such as wildlife area or their own backyards which is why the Lyme vaccination is so important.

 

Assessing the risk for your dog to get Lyme disease is a combination of where you live, your dog’s lifestyle and your dog’s overall health. While many dogs are at risk in their own backyards because of where they live, others may have hunting or travel lifestyles that put them at risk. Understanding the risk in your local area is important.  http://www.dogsandticks.com/map/2012/

 

The breed of your dog is not an important risk factor. Big or small, couch potato or hunting dog, any dog can be at risk. Whenever and wherever dogs come in close contact with ticks – usually wildlife areas where mice and deer live – the risk of exposure to Lyme disease is great 

 

The second important measure is consistent monthly preventatives against ticks. These products are also available at your veterinarian and include Frontline Plus and Nexgard. Ask your veterinarian which product will work best for you.   The bottom line is by staying proactive in your pet’s care and monthly preventative care, you can decrease the risk of severe disease and tick infestation that could affect them their entire life.

Information for this blog was compiled from http://www.lymeinfo.com,  a great source of information for canine Lyme disease. 

10 reasons Why Your Pet Should be on Flea Prevention

 

We love creatures of every different type at our clinic!  We love the barkers, the meowers, the squawkers, the rodents and the bunnies and the snakes and the lizards.  That said, there is one creature that we all hate. The flea!  Unfortunately, we have been seeing way too much of Ctenocephalides canis and felis lately.  Yes it’s spring and THEY”RE BACK!   It’s time to get your pet on parasite preventatives if they are not already on it.

 

  1. Fleas make their living by biting other animals and feeding on their blood.   When fleas bite they inject saliva into the skin of their host which can cause inflammation, itching, allergic dermatitis and hair loss.  Even worse, if the host is small enough or the number of fleas’ large enough, anemia can result from blood loss.

  2. Fleas don’t just bite your pet.  They bite you.  They bite your children.  Everybody gets itchy.

  3. A single female flea can lay up to 50 eggs each day and up to 2000 eggs in her short life time!!!  Of course by the time you discover that your pet has fleas, there are most likely eggs and larva throughout your home.Fleas act as a transport vehicle for the aptly named “Flea” tapeworm.    Pets ingest fleas as they groom.  Once the flea is in the digestive system, the larva breaks free and finds a home in your pet’s intestines. An adult tapeworm can grow up to 75 cm (29.5 inches).  According to CPAC (Companion Animal Parasite Council), “Infections of children with D. caninum following ingestion of an infected flea are occasionally reported. The disease induced in the child is generally mild, confined to the intestinal tract, and readily treated, but can still be distressing to the family.”

  4. Fleas carry the Plague – the Bubonic Plague.  This is particularly important in the Rocky Mountain States.

  5. Fleas carry Typhus and yes it can be transmitted to humans.  According to Pubmed Health, “Typhus is caused by one of two types of bacteria: Rickettsia typhi or Rickettsia prowazekii.” The form of typhus depends on which type of bacteria causes the infection. Murine typhus occurs in the southeastern and southern United States, often during the summer and fall. It is rarely deadly. Risk factors for murine typhus include:

    a.  Exposure to rat fleas or feces

    b.  Exposure to other animals such as cats, opossums, raccoons, skunks and rats

7.   Fleas can help to transmit “Cat Scratch” disease from one cat to another.  We humans get Cat Scratch Fever when we are scratched by an infected feline.

 8.  Fleas can transmit hemoplasmas, a blood borne parasite that can cause damage to the red calls which results in anemia in your pet.

 9.  Even if your pet never goes outdoors, you can carry fleas into the house on your pants legs. Fleas can survive the winter just fine as long as you continue to heat your home. 

 10. Once there is an established flea infestation, it can be time consuming and expensive to resolve.  Like so many other problems fleas are much easier to prevent than alleviate.

 I don’t know about you but I’m going to go make sure my dog is up to date on his flea prevention.