Kennel Cough

coughing dog
It’s fall. Besides the changing colors and cooler weather, Kennel Cough is another thing we expect to rear its ugly head every fall.

What is Kennel Cough?

  Kennel Cough is the common name for Canine Infectious Respiratory Disease Complex (CIRDC). It is seen in dogs in group situations such as kenneling, grooming, dog shows, dog parks etc. The symptoms include hacking, coughing, sneezing and retching.

 So, what causes Kennel Cough then?

 CIRDC can be caused by the following bugs:
 Virus: Bocavirus, Canine Adenovirus Type 2, Canine Corona Virus, Canine Distemper Virus, Canine Herpes Virus, Canine Influenza Parainfluenza, Pneumovirus and Reovirus.
 Bacteria: Bordetella Brochiseptica, Streptococcus Equi, Mycoplasma spp. and secondary bacterial infections.

Continue…

The Ugly Truth About Heartworm Disease

heartworm 2
We talk a lot about Heartworm infection. We urge to you keep your pet on preventives and to test for evidence of heartworm infection year after year after year. The problem is, what we really need to talk about is Heartworm Disease. It is the shadow in the room that both frightens and motivates us. Continue…

Parasite Perils: The Importance of Flea, Tick, and Heartworm Prevention

iStock_000000295959_LargeAs we begin to experience spring here in Davenport, we also must contend with the usual suspects of spring discomfort: fleas, mosquitoes, and ticks. Couple the warm, humid weather with some time on a lake or near the river, and voila, the biting commences. No wonder flea, tick, and heartworm prevention is a hot topic among pet owners. Continue…

Canine Influenza

 

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There has been a large outbreak of Canine Influenza in the Chicago area. However, there are no reported cases in the Quad Cities at this time. That said we do need to educate ourselves about the virus and understand that it could possibly spread to our area.

Canine Influenza H3N8 is a virus that was previously seen only in horses. The first cases in dogs appeared in 2004. In 2005, H3N8 was officially identified as a new and emerging pathogen in canines. It does not affect humans.

Canine Influenza is spread through the air and on contaminated surfaces such as kennels or clothing. It can survive on surfaces for up to 48 hours, on clothing for 24 hours and on hands for 12 hours. Incubation is generally 2-4 days. Unfortunately it is during this period, when the dog is not showing any clinical signs, that the virus is most infectious.

Because this is a new virus around 80% of the dogs who are exposed will develop the disease. About 20% will not show any clinical signs at all but still be contagious. A small number of symptomatic animals will develop a more severe form of influenza and pneumonia. Overall the mortality rate is low when compared to the rate of infection.

Signs of Canine Influenza can be similar to Canine Kennel Cough but are generally more severe in nature. You may see:

  • Nasal and Ocular (eyes) discharge

  • Sneezing

  • Moist or dry cough

  • Low grade fever

  • Anorexia ( lack of appetite)

  • More severe cases may develop (green/yellow and thick) discharge, a high fever and/or pneumonia.

 

Canine Influenza is a virus and as such treatment is primarily supportive in nature. Fluids, nutrition, rest and isolation will help the dog mount its own immune response. This is particularly important in those animals with a severe form of the virus. When pneumonia or purulent nasal discharge is present antibiotics may also be used to treat the secondary bacterial infection. Most dogs will recover within 2 – 3 weeks.

Canine Influenza cannot be diagnosed on clinical signs alone.   Laboratory testing is the only way to confirm an infection with H3N8. This may be done by nasal/throat swab or blood testing.

You can protect your dog by:

  • Canine Influenza vaccine. Vaccination may prevent or most certainly decrease the severity of the disease. It requires 2 vaccinations 2 – 4 weeks apart. Maximum protection can be expected 10 days after the second shot.

  • If the virus is in your community, keep your dog from group situations where you do not know the vaccination status of other pets.

  • At this time, use considerable caution if you travel with your pet to the Chicago area.

  • Remember to wash your hands after coming into contact with other dogs.

  • If your dog develops clinical signs, please isolate them from other pets and call your veterinarian.

Ticks and Fleas and Creepy Crawlers!!!!

 

The world is full of creepy, crawly bugs.  They all have a purpose in the eco-system but unfortunately some of them are not so good for our pets.  Below is some more information on one of the more important ones.

 

Although ticks are commonly thought of as insects, they are actually arachnids like scorpions, spiders and mites. Ticks have four pairs of legs as adults and have no antennae.  Ticks are also efficient carriers of disease because they attach firmly when sucking blood, feed slowly and may go unnoticed for a considerable time while feeding. Ticks can take several days to complete feeding.

Ticks can also carry a variety of diseases that can cause problems in our 4 legged friends. One of the most common diseases present in our area from tick attachment and feeding is Lyme Disease.

 

Lyme disease

An infected Ixodes tick (deer tick) transmits the Borrelia burgdorferi bacteria through the skin when it bites. Most dogs (as well as people) do not even feel the bite, which is why the tick can remain undiscovered.  After the initial bite through the skin, the tick secretes “cement” to anchor to its host where it is difficult to remove. Then, it begins to take in its blood meal 30 minutes later.

 

Amazingly, unlike most other insect bites, the tick’s bite is painless and non-irritating because its saliva contains:
– An anesthetic to numb and reduce pain
– An antihistamine to reduce allergic reaction or itching
– An anticoagulant to enhance blood flow
– An anti-inflammatory to reduce swelling
– An immunosuppressant to help aid in the transmission of pathogens

 

INFECTION DOES NOT HAPPEN IMMEDIATELY

The deer tick is very slow in transmitting the bacteria to dogs – only after the tick is partially engorged – 24 to 48 hours after attaching to the dog. This slow transmission of the disease shows the importance of checking your dog for ticks after being outside, even in your own backyard.

 

Dogs become infected with Lyme disease from the bite of an infected Ixodes tick called “the deer tick.” The tick must be infected with a specific bacterium called Borrelia burgdorferi for your dog to get canine Lyme disease. This bacteria is what actually causes canine Lyme disease – the tick is just the transmitter or “vector” for the bacteria.  Dogs don’t get Lyme disease from other dogs or people. Dogs can get Lyme disease anywhere there are infected ticks, such as wildlife area or their own backyards which is why the Lyme vaccination is so important.

 

Assessing the risk for your dog to get Lyme disease is a combination of where you live, your dog’s lifestyle and your dog’s overall health. While many dogs are at risk in their own backyards because of where they live, others may have hunting or travel lifestyles that put them at risk. Understanding the risk in your local area is important.  http://www.dogsandticks.com/map/2012/

 

The breed of your dog is not an important risk factor. Big or small, couch potato or hunting dog, any dog can be at risk. Whenever and wherever dogs come in close contact with ticks – usually wildlife areas where mice and deer live – the risk of exposure to Lyme disease is great 

 

The second important measure is consistent monthly preventatives against ticks. These products are also available at your veterinarian and include Frontline Plus and Nexgard. Ask your veterinarian which product will work best for you.   The bottom line is by staying proactive in your pet’s care and monthly preventative care, you can decrease the risk of severe disease and tick infestation that could affect them their entire life.

Information for this blog was compiled from http://www.lymeinfo.com,  a great source of information for canine Lyme disease. 

THE SHOCKING DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE COST OF PREVENTING PARASITES AND TREATING THEM.

 

Heartworm/Flea Prevention

 

DOG #1:  10 pound Dachshund:

Heartgard up to 25#  12 DOSES $79.54  
Frontline up to 22#  6 + 2 free $127.54  
Discount   -$25.00  
Rebate   -$12.00  
+/- Heartworm Test     $47.51
Total cost  

$184.58

$269.09

Trifexis 10.1–20#  12 doses $224.84  
Rebate   -$25.00  
+/- Heartworm test     $47.51
Total Cost

 

$215.58

$288.09

Heartworm Treatment

Initial examination   $49.76  
Pretreatment Laboratory   $115.74  
Pretreatment Radiographs   $178.29  
Pretreatment Medications   $29.39  
Immiticide Treatment   $107.39  
Post Heartworm test   $47.51  
Hospitalization 3 days   $128.97  
+/-  Pretreatment ECG     $173.43
Total cost  

$659.11

$832.54

Intestinal Parasite Treatment

Intestinal Parasite Screen   $31.52  
Panacur 1 gram  (Rounds, Whips, Hooks) 2 treatments $22.48  
Cestex  ( Tapeworms)   $36.92  
Post Parasite Screen   $31.52  
Mycodex Premise Spray  fleas present $36.92  
Total Cost

 

$143.70

 

DOG #2: 50# Golden:

 

 

Heartgard 26-50#  12 DOSES $102.58  
Frontline 45-88#  6 + 2 free $127.54  
Discount   -$25.00  
Rebate   -$12.00  
+/- Heartworm Test     $47.51
Total cost  

$206.27

$290.78

Trifexis 40.1-60#  12 doses $237.08  
Rebate   -$25.00  
+/- Heartworm test     $47.51
Total Cost  

$228.68

$301.19

Heartworm Treatment

Initial examination   $49.76  
Pretreatment Laboratory   $115.74  
Pretreatment Radiographs   $178.29  
Pretreatment Medications   $38.77  
Immiticide Treatment   $658.07  
Post Heartworm test   $47.51  
Hospitalization 3 days   $128.97  
+/-  Pretreatment ECG     $173.43
Total cost

 

$1,219.83

$1,393.26

 

Intestinal Parasite Treatment

Intestinal Parasite Screen   $31.52  
Panacur 1 gram  (Rounds, Whips, Hooks) 2 treatments $22.48  
Panacur 4 gram  (Rounds, Whips, Hooks) 2 treatments $47.82  
Cestex  ( Tapeworms)   $36.92  
Post Parasite Screen   $31.52  
Mycodex Premise Spray  fleas present $36.92  
Total Cost

 

$233.24

 

DOG #3: 90# Great Pyrenees:

 

Heartgard 50-100#  12 DOSES $123.10  
Frontline 45-88#  6 + 2 free $127.54  
Discount   -$25.00  
Rebate   -$12.00  
+/- Heartworm Test     $47.51
Total cost

 

$231.19

$315.70

Trifexis 60.1-120#  12 doses $245.36  
Rebate   -$25.00  
+/- Heartworm test     $47.51
Total Cost

 

$237.54

$310.05

Heartworm Treatment

Initial examination   $49.76  
Pretreatment Laboratory   $115.74  
Pretreatment Radiographs   $178.29  
Pretreatment Medications   $58.75  
Immiticide Treatment   $1,116.97  
Post Heartworm test   $47.51  
Hospitalization 3 days   $128.97  
+/-  Pretreatment ECG     $173.43
Total cost  

$1,700.10

$1,873.53

Intestinal Parasite Treatment

Intestinal Parasite Screen   $31.52  
Panacur 1 gram  (Rounds, Whips, Hooks) 2 treatments $63.04  
Panacur 4 gram  (Rounds, Whips, Hooks) 2 treatments $90.64  
Cestex  ( Tapeworms)   $36.92  
Post Parasite Screen   $31.52  
Mycodex Premise Spray  fleas present $36.92  
Total Cost  

$313.16

 

 

Summary

 

Prevention

Treat Heartworm

Treat Intestinal Worms

10# Dog

$215.58-$288.09

$659.11-$832.54

$143.70

50# Dog

$206.27-$290.78

$1219.83-1393.26

$233,24

90# Dog

$231.19-$315.70

$1700.10-$1873.53

$313.16

 

The real question is why would you not

prevent???????

 

Blastomycosis

 

Blastomycosis is a systemic fungal infection which causes illness when it is either inhaled into the lungs causing pneumonia or introduced into an open wound causing a localized skin infection.  Once the organism is in the body it transforms into yeast and can migrate to the lymph nodes, eyes, bones and central nervous system. The disease has a 1 to 3 month incubation period. Blastomycosis is common in the Great lakes and Mississippi river basin area and is found in sandy, acidic soil near water. We do see and treat cases at Animal Family.  There has recently been an uptick in cases in the greater Chicago area so it is worth familiarizing yourself with the symptoms of this disease.

 Dogs are the species most susceptible to Blastomycosis.  People and cats can become infected as well but with much less frequency.  In dogs, hunting breeds aged 2 – 4 years are the typical patient.  When cats do become infected they are generally young to middle aged.

Signs may include some but not all of the following:

  • Weight loss/depression
  • Fever up to 104 F (seen in 50% of cases)
  • Swollen Lymph nodes
  • Decreased appetite
  • Harsh, dry cough (pneumonia)
  • Enlarged testicles
  • Redness and discharge from the eyes (ocular)
  • Lameness (bone)
  • Draining skin lesions (cutaneous)
  • Fainting if the heart is affected
  • Seizures and dementia if the central nervous system is affected.

Diagnosis is made through:

  • Radiographs in cases of cough and pneumonia.
  • Cytology of lung/ lymph node aspirates and skin lesions.
  • Histopathology of bone lesions.Laboratory cultures of tissue samples.
  • Blood titers

Treatment with antifungal medications is successful in 75% of the cases. If antifungals are unsuccessful, surgical removal of lung abscesses may be required. In animals with severe breathing problems, supplemental oxygen may be required for up to a week. Even with treatment, animals with eye involvement may become permanently blind. Males with testicular involvement generally require castration. Early diagnosis improves the chance for survival.  About 20% of dogs may relapse and require a second course of treatment