Pet 911: When is it a Pet Emergency?

pet emergencyMost pet owners are prepared for wellness visits and preventive care, but we also know our adventurous pets can sometimes be involved in accidents or become ill. Sometimes, these situations require emergency care and, in extreme cases, surgery. The key to successful recovery is often how quickly your pet is brought in for evaluation and treatment.

Sometimes, however, it’s hard to recognize when a pet emergency is happening. To give you a quick guide to pet emergencies, including those that might require surgery, the team at AFVCC put together a list of problems that require an immediate trip to the pet emergency room.

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Beyond Fresh Breath: Why Pet Home Dental Care Is So Important

pet home dental careMost pet owners are familiar with the unpleasant (or downright foul) stench of doggie or kitty breath, but did you know that bad breath can indicate less-than-stellar dental health for a pet? Studies show that 85% of adult pets have some form of dental disease, and the bacteria found in plaque and tartar can have a negative impact on the heart, lungs, kidneys and liver.

When it comes to pets, a healthy mouth is paramount to a healthy body. You can help your furry friend achieve optimal oral health through a commitment to pet home dental care, and your team at Animal Family Veterinary Care Center can get you started.

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Preventing Pancreatitis in Pets: Knowing the Score This Thanksgiving

pancreatitis in petsIf you haven’t had enough pumpkin spice flavor in your life lately, you’re in luck. Thanksgiving is just around the corner, a fact that has most Americans jumping for joy. Between the turkey, gravy, casseroles, and desserts, we consume far more than we ought to – and pay for it later.

The endless indulgence does not set a great example for our pets either, who watch every move we make intently. It’s no wonder that pancreatitis in pets occurs like clockwork every holiday season. Fortunately, there are definite ways to counteract this dangerous medical condition.

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The Scary Consequences of Not Doing that Dental

 

Don’t wait for the telltale signs of bad breath before scheduling dental care for your pet. By the time an unpleasant odor is evident they will be well on the way to serious dental disease.

Think Dog Breath = Early Disease. Bad Breath = Bad Disease.

 

    • Gingivitis:   Is defined as inflammation of gum tissue caused by a buildup of plaque and tartar. This is the start of dental disease and provides the perfect environment for bacteria to thrive.  Inflammation, swelling and bleeding gums are the body screaming for dental care before things get worse.

      • Inflammation: The presence of inflammation and bacteria will cue up your pet’s immune system. With chronic inflammation, the immune response never shuts off which can damage heart, lungs and kidneys.

    • Gingival Recession: Untreated gingivitis and inflammation damages tissues causing  gums to pull away from teeth.  This exposes  sensitive tooth roots which do not have the same protective enamel as the crown and are more susceptible to damage.

    • Bone Loss:   Once the more vulnerable roots have been exposed, destructive bacteria release toxins which then eat away surrounding bone.

    • Root Abscess: The combination of inflammation, bacteria, gum recession and bone loss can lead to tooth root abscesses resulting in the loss of affected teeth.

    • Tooth Loss: As the cascade of damage continues, teeth will begin to wobble.  A decrease in appetite, weight loss and general malaise brought on by pain follows.

    • Oronasal Fistula: Severe dental disease can damage enough bone to create an opening between your pet’s mouth and nasal tract. At this stage, chronic respiratory issues are added to dental pain and disease.

    • Jaw Fracture: Continued bone loss can lead to fracture of the lower jaw.

    • Organ damage and Systemic Disease: This is the end game for untreated dental disease. Bacteria and chronic inflammation wreak havoc on the kidneys, liver, heart and overall health robbing your pet of not only quality but quantity of life.

5 Whys of Pet Wellness Visits

  • Animals mask illness.

    • Domesticated, well maybe but first and foremost your dog, cat, rabbit, bird etc… is still an animal and the number one rule in the animal kingdom is that the critter that shows weakness gets eaten first. Even if fluffy lives on the couch that fact is hardwired into his/her brain.

    • Wellness visits are our chance to circumvent to the “no talk rule.” They give us the information we need to catch brewing illnesses before they become major problems.

  • Preventative care costs much less than sick care.

    • Don’t like the cost of vaccines? Paying for the cost of treating Parvo, pneumonia or heartworm disease, far outweigh the cost of prevention.

    • Simple economics. Prevention is always less costly than treatment plus your pet doesn’t suffer damage to the organs that many diseases cause.

  • Your pet will live longer.

    • Good preventative care that catches problems early extends lifespan.

    • Good dental care adds even more.

  • Some of the things we prevent can make you sick too.

    • Most of us let our pets sleep with us so it’s a good idea to make sure they are healthy and parasite free.

  • It’s just the right thing to do.

    • Come on! Pets give us so much unconditional love, protection and service. Let’s do what we can to give them a long and healthy life in return.

Ready to Care for Breed-Specific Conditions? The Most Common Pet Health Problems  

You might like the look and temperament of a certain pet breed, only to find out that there are serious pet health problems associated with it. Of course, not every pet will suffer from issues that affect the breed in general, but it is important to acknowledge the health prospects of a prospective pet, both before and during the adoption process. The more information you have in the beginning, the more compatible you and your pet will be in the long  run.

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Worst Case Scenario: Protect Your Friend With a Pet Fire Safety Plan

Statistics alone make a pet fire safety plan an important priority. Pets are responsible for hundreds of house fires each year, but more than 50,000 pets annually are threatened by an inferno at home. It’s urgent that we all spend a little extra time this summer acknowledging fire risks, designing a pet fire safety plan, and understanding the in’s and out’s of evacuating your home.

Disaster Prep

Request a safety pack from the ASPCA. Rescue workers know to look for these on doors and windows and can quickly get to work looking for your pet. There are other pointers on the website for ASPCA Disaster Preparedness.

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Is Pet Anxiety Normal at the Start of the School Year?

pet anxietyIt might seem a bit early, but it’s good to be prepared if your pet will experience any changes to the household dynamic this coming school year. During the summer months, the house may be absolutely brimming with squeals of laughter, blobs of peanut butter and honey, and a never-ending parade of activity. But what happens when the school year starts?

Confusing quiet, discomforting boredom, and pet anxiety are normal at the launch of the academic year, but these anxieties can be prevented – and the team at Animal Kind can help you prepare.

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When You Like Someone, But Your Pet Doesn’t…

There is possibly nothing as discouraging as meeting Mr. or Ms. Right only to have your pet loathe your new crush. After all, you adore that little fur snookum and have been waiting to introduce the new love interest to your family-member pet.

Unfortunately, that ideal meeting goes south when your pet runs for cover, shaking, or worse – growls and snaps at your new sweetheart.

For some pet owners, the immediate response is, “Ugh oh, what’s wrong with this person?” However, sometimes your pet’s keen intuition on character isn’t so reliable and has more to do with behavioral challenges than psychic powers.

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Handling Hepatic Harm: An Owner’s Guide to Pet Liver Problems

The liver may not be the most glamorous internal organ, but as far as function goes, it is the workhorse of the body. Having a happy liver is vital to good health. Unfortunately, liver issues are not uncommon to find in our pet patients. Animal Family Veterinary Care Center wants all of our pet parents to understand why the liver is so important and what to expect when we find pet liver problems.

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