Kennel Cough

coughing dog
It’s fall. Besides the changing colors and cooler weather, Kennel Cough is another thing we expect to rear its ugly head every fall.

What is Kennel Cough?

  Kennel Cough is the common name for Canine Infectious Respiratory Disease Complex (CIRDC). It is seen in dogs in group situations such as kenneling, grooming, dog shows, dog parks etc. The symptoms include hacking, coughing, sneezing and retching.

 So, what causes Kennel Cough then?

 CIRDC can be caused by the following bugs:
 Virus: Bocavirus, Canine Adenovirus Type 2, Canine Corona Virus, Canine Distemper Virus, Canine Herpes Virus, Canine Influenza Parainfluenza, Pneumovirus and Reovirus.
 Bacteria: Bordetella Brochiseptica, Streptococcus Equi, Mycoplasma spp. and secondary bacterial infections.

Continue…

The Truth About Cats

 mufasa

Cats. Kot, Katt, Gato, Got, Kissa, Felis catus. They domesticated themselves, of course, 3500 years ago but have been around our periphery since prehistoric times. Whether you love them or hate them, cats maintain a kind of tolerant interdependence with mankind. They are neither master nor slave and though they may love us it is only on their own terms.

Our domestic relationship with cats evolved because it was mutually beneficial to us both. They were attracted to the rats and mice near human grain stores and we enjoyed the rodent control cats provided. They slowly became accustomed enough to us to grudgingly move inside our homes. Today while there are some fancier breeds of cats out there by and large they remain unchanged.

How amazing are cats? Check it out.

  • Cats are a true carnivore. That means that unlike humans or dogs they cannot survive on a vegetarian diet. They require active vitamin A, arachidonic acid and taurine all of which are derived from animal tissues. If cats could talk they would tell us they want meat baby meat.

  • Cats don’t have a fixed clavicle which means they can fit through any opening large enough for their head.

  • Cats are especially agile. Their highly flexible vertebrae allow them to rotate their spine up to 180 degrees. This and their righting reflex is what allows them to always land on their feet.

  • Cats have the same number of vertebrae as us until you add their tail which is comprised of 30 more.

  • Cats can jump! As in up to 5 – 6 times their own height.

  • If you are a cat lover or fancier you are an Ailurophile.

  • Speaking of Ailurophiles, the ancient Egyptians loved their cats so much that they dressed them in jewels. If a cat died, the grieving family would shave their eyebrows. Mourning continued until all the hair grew back.  Cats were also often mummified and placed in tombs alongside nobility.

  • Cats are smart too. They meow for our benefit alone. They use different vocalizations to communicate with each other. Cats have a surprisingly large vocabulary too, containing of up to 100 varied sounds.

  • Cats hearing is much better than humans or dogs. They also have superior night vision but people can see a wider variety of colors. At least we win at something.

  • A group of cats is called a clowder or a pounce. The first is probably just a variant on the word clutter.

  • A cat’s brain is more similar to a human’s than a dog.

  • Cat’s purr when they are happy but also when they are frightened or in pain. One researcher found that purring may actually promote healing and aid in pain relief.

  • A Bobcat can purr but not a lion.

  • According to legend, Noah was alarmed by the number of mice running around the ark and prayed for guidance. God told him to rub the lion’s nose. This produced a sneeze from the lion which contained two cats. Later legends would say that knowing he came from the lion is what made the cat so vain.

  • Cats have 30 adult teeth, humans have 32 and dogs have 42.

  • One unaltered queen can produce 100 or more kittens in her lifespan. Her kittens and their kittens can produce up to 400,000 kittens. Cats are wonderful but if they reproduce without control we can’t provide homes for them all. Please spay and neuter your cats.

The Ugly Truth About Heartworm Disease

heartworm 2
We talk a lot about Heartworm infection. We urge to you keep your pet on preventives and to test for evidence of heartworm infection year after year after year. The problem is, what we really need to talk about is Heartworm Disease. It is the shadow in the room that both frightens and motivates us. Continue…

National Kid and Pet Day

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It’s National Kid and Pet Day on April 26th! We thought we should celebrate by sharing some of the wonderful things pets do for all of. If you have had a special pet in your life, please feel free to share your stories and photos on our Facebook page.

They keep us healthy!!

caption thisPets help lower blood pressure, ease loneliness and get us out and exercising. They increase self-esteem, elevate mood and reduce stress. They reduce Cholesterol, decrease the development of allergies and extend lifespan after a heart attack. They are a powerful drug with no side effects.

 

 

They bring us joy!

cute bulldog puppyIs there anything better than unconditional love? The whole world may be upset with us but not our dog or cat or bunny. They are always there ready to provide love and the reassurance that at least they still think we are awesome.

 

 

They make us laugh!

summertimeThere is a reason why silly cat and puppy videos are ubiquitous on the internet. They make us laugh. They make us smile. They even make us more human.

 

 

They give us a sense of purpose.

SAM_0185We all need something to give us purpose. Pets perform that function in many people’s lives. They teach the young what it means to have responsibility for the wellbeing of another living being. As we age they keep us company and give us purpose.

 

 

They are a social magnet!!

kids and dogThey give us common ground and ease the awkwardness of meeting new people. It can be hard to come up with small talk when we are one on but add a pet to the mix and we’re instant chatter boxes. This goes double for children with social anxiety. Animals are the ultimate ice breaker.

 

They serve and protect.

Open House Photos 025 They guide the blind, help the hearing disabled and predict seizures. They sniff out bombs and drugs and tasty mushrooms. They work as soldiers and peace officers. They love us and protect our home and family. They do it all.   Yet all they ask in return is just a small place in our hearts and shelter.

 

 

Spring Pet Safety Checklist

camp canine 05-07-11 004

  • Dispose of antifreeze safely:

    • Even so-called pet safe antifreeze can be toxic to your pet.

    • Ethylene Glycol ingestion causes incoordination, disorientation and lethargy progressing to vomiting, kidney failure and death.

    • Treatment must begin as soon as possible. Call your veterinarian. Early intervention and treatment is imperative to a good outcome.

    • For more information:

  • Check your yard for hazards hidden in the snow over the winter:e-collar dog

    • As the snow melts do a safety walk through your yard. You never know what may have been dropped or thrown over the fence. This small precaution can keep your pet safe from injury and poisoning.

  • Spring cleaning products:

    • Spring clean-up often involves chemicals that can be caustic to the sensitive tissues of the eyes, mouth and paw pads. Others may be toxic if ingested. Remember to keep cleaning materials and rags safely out of the way.

  • Fleas and ticks and spiders and bees – Oh My!!!tick

    • With spring so come all of Mother Nature’s creeping, crawling and flying creatures. Make sure your pets are up to date on both flea and tick preventatives.

    • A sudden swelling of the face and muzzle and/or bumps under the hair can be an indicator of an allergic reaction to bee or spider bites. These can become severe and require treatment by a veterinarian.

  • Parasites like spring too:

    • Parasites of all types appear with increasing temperatures. Make sure your pet is current on their intestinal and heartworm tests.flea-1

    • Remember the mosquitos that carry heartworm become active in temperatures as low as 50 degrees. It’s just one pill a month and parasites are so much easier to prevent than treat.

  • Protect against diseases such as Lyme, Leptospirosis , Canine Parvovirus and others

    • Lyme disease is carried by ticks so small they often go unnoticed. The larger Brown Dog Ticks can spread the disease as well. Lyme disease can cause inflammation of joints, lameness, lethargy, loss of appetite as well as damage to the kidneys and other organs.Rooms

    • Leptospirosis is transmitted through urine and is spread through the water and other warm, moist environments. The disease can cause joint pain, lethargy, loss of appetite, jaundice, vomiting and other symptoms. Most importantly, Leptospirosis can be shared with you.

    • Canine Parvovirus is incredibly hardy and able to survive long periods in the environment. Parvovirus causes, lethargy, severe vomiting, bloody diarrhea, rapid dehydration and if left untreated death.

    • They are all preventable. VACCINATE.

  • The doors we open to let spring in also let pets out:

    • Get your pet microchipped. You will be happy you did because unlike collars, microchips can’t be lost. They have helped reunite many pets and owners over great distances and time.

  • Spring is gardening time.Kemo and Pyra Phaedra jones Mcnamara Wlochal

    • Many of the spring bulbs we plant in our gardens are toxic to pets.

    • The same goes for fertilizers and herbicides. Please use care around children and pets.

    • For a complete list of Toxic plants go to:

      • http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/animal-poison-control/toxic-and-non-toxic-plants

 

Caring For Niabi’s Older Animals – reprinted from the Quad City Times

The following is a reprint from a Quad City Times article written by Barb Ickes.  Doctor Lauren Hughes of Animal Family Veterinary Care Center also cares for The Niabi Zoo animals.  Most of our clients have an active interest in the zoo so we wanted to make sure you all had a chance to read the article.

 

COAL VALLEY — The zookeepers at Niabi hope to soften the blow.

Death may not be imminent, but it will come. And it is time to prepare.

Several of Niabi Zoo’s residents would be in nursing homes by now if such an option existed. It doesn’t, so the keepers are doing their best to make their seniors comfortable and content as age and nature conspire against them.

Growing old is not much different for animals from the way it is for humans. The process spares no breed.mufasa

Mufasa, a lion born at Niabi, will be 21 years old this year. His life expectancy in the wild would have expired six or seven years ago. His large, keen eyes are fogging with cataracts, and his appetite is waning. He moves more slowly than before, and he shows little interest in going outdoors.

Carnivore keeper Jessica Lench Porter is Mufasa’s primary keeper, but her position requires more than doling out doses of high-protein horse meat and daily medications.

One of the most valuable skills Porter and the other keepers have to offer their geriatric menagerie is knowing them well enough to recognize a natural decline.

For Mufasa and several others, the decline has begun.

‘Mufasa is an icon here’

Niabi’s two female lions, Savanna and Nala, are about half Mufasa’s age.

One has been spayed, and the other is on birth control. Although the nearly 21-year-old male remains capable of fathering their cubs, he lacks the paperwork to prove he would be a good candidate.

“Part of his genetics are unknown,” zoo Director Marc Heinzman said. “We don’t want to accidentally interbreed.”

Mufasa did, in fact, sire two cubs. One had to be put down after it was seriously injured in an enclosure-door malfunction, and the other died of natural causes. It is impossible, zoo officials said, to know whether genetics played a role in the latter fatality. Heinzman said the pregnancy occurred before he was zoo director, and he does not know why it was permitted.

But the point is moot now, anyway.

Mufasa lives separately from the two females that occupy Niabi’s main lion exhibit. He has been bunking for two years with the jaguar and leopards that live in the large cat area. All three lions were moved there in 2012, when work was being done on the lion exhibit. Although Savanna and Nala have been returned to the lion house, he is not going back.

Some controversy has surrounded the decision to keep Mufasa sequestered from the other lions. Members of the public have complained that he should remain with the pride because of lions’ social nature.

But it is best, keepers say, for Mufasa to live out his life right where he is. His eyesight is too poor to hope that he could manage the transition.

“He wouldn’t know his surroundings,” Porter said. “We’re not going to set him up to fail.”

As it is, Mufasa is experiencing enough failures. He has become increasingly stubborn and less motivated by food. His usual daily feeding of nine pounds of raw meat has been reduced to seven pounds, and he often leaves some behind.

All four of his thumb-sized canine teeth are chipped from wear, and the last time he was sedated for a medical procedure, it took him days to recover.

“In the wild, he’d have been kicked out of the pride because of his age,” Porter said. “The best thing we can do is look out for him.”

To give proper care, the keeper continues old training routines that keep Mufasa in a cooperative spirit. With daily reminders of what is expected of him, the old male usually complies when Porter makes her demands.

“If I can get him to stand up, I can see his underside,” she said. “He can present both sides, and he can follow the command to open his mouth, so we can see his teeth.

“But it’s also very important that I know what’s going on with him in other ways. I need to know, for instance, if he’s favoring one side when he chews his food. I need to spot any changes in him.”

Niabi’s house veterinarian, Dr. Lauren Hughes, said the keepers are her “eyes and ears” when she is not on the grounds.

“Because they work with the collection every day, they are able to see sudden changes in normal behavior, which can include a decreased appetite, loss of body condition or even something as simple as not coming out of their hiding places or dens as frequently,” she said. “Although these changes may all seem subtle, we have actually been able to catch illnesses very early in several animals in the collection due to their keen observations.”

Porter also can spot personality quirks.

In Mufasa’s case, he finds a bellowing territory call to be necessary throughout the day. A once-or-twice-a-day call is sufficient for most male lions, but Mufasa throws back his mane and produces a chest-vibrating series of roars at least once an hour.

The scale that he agreeably steps onto every two weeks shows he is down 38 pounds from his maximum weight of 410.

“He still has good body condition,” Porter said. “He’s giving us no reason to euthanize him. He’s just in that geriatric stage. Mufasa is an icon here. People come just to see him.

“The day will come when he isn’t here. In the meantime, he’s in the only place he’s ever known. He knows what to expect from me, and he is well fed and cared for. I’ve been here for 13 years, and you obviously form an attachment, but you also have to keep a distance.

“Old age comes to wild animals just like it does for people. You accept it.”

Jackson the jaguar

Although Mufasa has a good track record of cooperating in the care-critical task of bimonthly weigh-ins, one of his enclosure mates has his own ideas.jackson the jag

Sometimes, when Porter pushes the big-cat scale into his enclosure, Jackson the jaguar takes off with it. If someone told him the four-foot-long metal scale is not a toy, Jackson wasn’t listening.

Turning 20 this year, the jet-black jag also is well beyond his prime. Big cats in the wild are lucky to survive into their early-to-mid-teens, Porter said.

“At the end of December, tests showed he’s in early kidney failure,” she said. “His appetite also is diminishing. These are things we want people to know. Instead of reacting when we have a death, we want the public to know what’s going on.”

For now, Jackson is holding his own.

“He’s definitely still got it,” Porter said. “He’s still agile. He’s not one to pace. He’s a stalker. He sits there and thinks things through.”

He also has his quirks, including a fascination with his medicine-ball-like toy, which is made of tightly wound fire hose.

“That’s one of his favorite things,” she said. “He drags it everywhere.”

He also sucks on his tail.

“I’m not alarmed by it, because he’s done it for at least 10 years,” she said. “I have no idea why.

“We can’t convey enough how important it is that we know their behaviors, so they don’t suffer in any way. I think of it this way: If you’re getting older, and your eyesight is going, kidneys failing and appetite diminishing, don’t you want care?

“We have all these bottles with different scents — even some spices and extracts. We hide these things in their enclosures, changing up smells and toys. Mental stimulation is hugely important to quality of life, and people forget to apply that to animals, too.

“We want the end of their lives to be comfortable.”

Two tamarins

Even though their enclosure is small, cotton-top tamarins Eddie and Goose are not easy to spot.

Among the smallest of all primates, the two are similar in size to squirrels. Frequently spending their time side-by-size in their new exhibit in the zoo’s main entrance, they are easily dwarfed by their roommate, a two-toed sloth.

Now in their golden years, the tamarins are empty-nesters.

The life expectancy for tamarins in the wild is 13. Eddie will be 14 this year, and Goose will turn 13.

“They’ve had many babies,” Porter said. “They’ve been here most of their lives.”

The tiny primates are new charges for Porter, who is learning to care for and train the pair.

“I’m not 100 percent confident with primates, so I don’t hand-feed them,” she said as she slipped through a small door and into their enclosure last week. “Training them to go into a crate is important, so they don’t have to be captured.

“Also, with these guys being geriatric, we need them to get on a scale.”

The two, especially Eddie, are showing no signs of letting up on their food motivation.

As Porter entered their enclosure with a plastic cup of meal worms, Eddie made his move. The tamarins have been trained to expect their food after touching a “target.” In their case, the target is a wand-sized stick with a green bulb at one end. When they touch the bulb, Porter blows on a small whistle, and they are permitted to reach in for a meal worm.

In his excitement, Eddie emits frequent bird-like chirps and reaches repeatedly for the target.

“They really like insects,” Porter said. “They’re easy for them to eat, too. We have to cook some of their food to make it easier. We soften the potatoes that are added to their Primate Diet food.”

After spending decades with big cats and Niabi’s now-relocated elephants, Porter said she is enjoying the challenge of learning more about the petite primates.

“You definitely get their personalities,” she said. “They have a very complex vocalization system. They have an ear-piercing alarm call. I was doing an educational tour in this room recently, and I got out one of the snakes. The tamarins screamed their heads off.”

The ongoing training with Eddie and Goose, along with close and frequent observation, make it possible for them to survive several more years. But their continued longevity is not guaranteed.

“If you come one day and enjoy seeing them, and they’re not here on the next visit, you have to understand: They’re getting up there,” Porter said. “We have to face it

From the zoo’s vet

Dr. Lauren Hughes is the house veterinarian at Niabi Zoo. She explained:Lauren BIO pic 2

“In regards to the senior animals in our collection: It is a testament to the hard work and care of the zoo staff that their longevity is even an issue, and as frustrating as this may be, it is a great issue to have.

“Due to the high quality of care for these animals, they are well outliving their expected survival rates in the wild. That being said, this presents a new series of challenges similar to those that people face with their domestic pets.

“For example, renal disease is one of the most common diseases of geriatric felines. The same holds true for exotic felines in zoo collections.

“In a domestic setting, we can manage these animals by changing their diets, modifying their care plans to include extra means of hydration like fluids under the skin, and monitoring their blood pressure. In a zoo collection, all of these options are not always possible due to safety reasons with these large, apex predators.

“Their diets are already optimized to the highest protein possible, and there isn’t always an ability to administer fluids or monitor blood pressure without compromising staff safety or using sedatives, which isn’t always the safest option for the animal in question or their underlying illnesses.

10 Things My Dog Taught Me

 hannah 5

 

  • Today is the only day that counts. camp canine 05-07-11 004

    • The past is already gone and the future isn’t here yet so why ruin the beauty of today. Don’t spend so much time brooding about what’s gone or hasn’t happened yet that you miss the magnificence that is today.
  • Don’t hold grudges.

    • If you’re honest with yourself, there are truly very few things in life worth staying angry about. Forgive and then forget about it.Cooper k9 kindness

  • Food is meant to enjoy.

    • Yes we need to eat healthy food but it can still be enjoyable. Sometimes we get so caught up in what is best for us we forget to add in some of what makes us feel the best.

  • Exercise is important but make sure you have a great time while you’re getting it.

    • Have you ever watched how much fun your dog has playing outside? Don’t forget to put plenty of play into your exercise schedule.agility dog

  • Never be afraid to show someone just how much you love them.

    • Well, OK temper this a little, at least until you really get to know the object of your affection but there is someone special in your life make sure they know it!

  • Play hard, Rest hard!

           When you have fun don’t be afraid to let go and enjoy it for all it’s worth!   After fun, well… after fun there is always time for a good nap in the sun.summertime

  • Sometimes rules are meant to be broken.

    • Everybody needs rules but what we don’t need is to make life so hard and so circumscribed that there is no room left to be us. Go ahead and stray off the path of perfection once in a while. It’s OK. Your dog said so.

  • Growing old is really OK.

    • Dogs don’t waste a whole lot of time on their outward appearance. They may be old or missing an eye or maybe even a limb but they know that the most important thing is having friends who love you.10334375_321584181300002_8022760032003261428_n[1]

 

  • Take time to stop and investigate your world.

    • Take the time to really enjoy the world around you. It’s a wonderful place. As a species, we humans spend way too much time rushing and fussing and fixing but not near enough time just enjoying.ball and dog

    • Don’t be afraid to leave your mark on the world.

      Your mark may be your children, your wood carving, your poetry, music or maybe just the way the way you made someone smile. The point is, that it doesn’t really matter. Just don’t be afraid to let the world know that you are here.underdog

10 GOOD Reasons Why Your Next Pet Should Come From a Shelter

puck and santaIn the spirit of giving this holiday season we thought we would remind you why your next pet should come from one of our local shelters.

 

  1. You know what you are getting.

    Unlike a puppy, if you adopt an adult animal, he/she will already have a fully developed personality. In addition, most shelters temperament test their animals before putting them up for adoption so there is little chance of bringing home an unstable animal.

  2. Some animals receive extra training and socialization.singing beagle

    How great is it to get a pet that is already house trained! Even better, if you adopt through an agency that utilizes foster care, your pet may have received some basic obedience training as well. Shelters will generally be willing to help you should problems develop post adoption.

  3. Your new companion wants and appreciates the chance to bond with you.

    Ending up in a shelter is a scary process. Pets may arrive there due to the death of a previous owner, financial difficulties, or simply because they got lost. These are usually great animals who just need a second chance and will be forever grateful to their new owner.singing dog 3

  4. Shelters are a better option than a puppy mill.

    You have no idea about the breeding, or socialization of animals that come from a puppy mill. You may pay a large amount of money for a pet that has spent its entire life in a small kennel with little human contact. When profit is the main motivator, you can be sure that little attention is paid to preventing inherited disorders either

  5. You are saving lives.

    When you adopt a pet from a shelter you are not only saving the pet you bring home but making room for another animal in that facility or foster program as well. It feels pretty singing dog 5good to save one life but it’s even better when it’s two.

  6. You are helping your community. When you adopt from your local humane society the fees you pay help to fund all of their programs. Most shelters also provide community education, patrol for strays and lost pets and ensure animals they adopt out are spayed or neutered.

  7. You will have help finding the right animal for your family.

    Shelters want their placements to work and they will work hard to help you find the right animal for your home environment. Unlike buying from a pet store, you get to know ahead of time if your dog or cats prefers children or other pets.singing dog4

  8. Yes, you can find a purebred animal.

    A surprising number of purebred dogs and cats can be found at your local humane society. Being a purebred does not make them immune from circumstances that can land them in a shelter.

  9. Shelters also have puppies and kittens and ferrets and rabbits and birds .

    If you really love having a baby in the house, shelters usually have young animals up for adoption too. They can also be a great place to find your next rabbit, guinea pig or ferret.

  10. Your pet may already be spayed or neutered.sing along

    Because all shelters are concerned about pet overpopulation, your pet will most likely already be altered. If you adopt an animal that is too young most provide vouchers for later spaying and neutering. That’s one less thing for you to worry about.

Here are links to our local shelters:

Humane Society of Scott County

Quad City Animal Welfare Center

K-9 Kindnessprince and Santa

King’s Harvest

Rock Island County Animal Shelter

Animal Aid

Great Activities You Can Share With Your Dog

Think back to when you adopted your first dog.  Did you dream of having a perfect, almost cosmic connection with your pet?  Dogs are amazing creatures but we often leave them to languish at home while we work, play and get on with our lives. Guess what?  You can still create that special partnership with your dog and we’re going to show you how.

There is a world full of fun activities you can share with your pet.  No matter what the breed, as long as your dog is healthy enough, the two of you can add excitement and fun to both of your lives.  It’s also the best way to build a lasting bond with your dog

Listed below are just some of the many activities that are out just waiting for you and your dog.


  • Animal Assisted Therapy: Do you have a dog that simply loves people and attention?  There are programs available to certify both you and your dog for therapy work.  Not only will you have the joy of building the human-animal bond yourself but you get to share it with others. For more information check out this link. http://www.redcross.org/pa/harrisburg/local-services/animal-assisted-therapy


  • Tracking: Do you own a highly energetic beagle or one of the other “nose” breeds?  Try tracking. It can be competitive such as events put on by AKC https://www.akc.org/events/tracking/getting_started.cfm or as part of a search and rescue effort http://www.searchdogfoundation.org/.  Either way, tracking allows your dog to use his/her natural ability to find and follow human scent.  It’s outdoors, great exercise and can be both fun and a life-saving activity.


  • Carting: Think carting is just for horses? It can also be a wonderful activity for larger breed dogs, many of whom were actually used for this purpose in the past.  Carting can be either a competitive sport or a fun past time. The choice is yours. http://k9carting.com/


  • Lure Coursing: This is a great sport for Sight Hounds. AKC Lure Coursing events use an artificial stimulant to awaken the natural coursing instinct. It is not dissimilar to track racing but much more fun because it is non-competitive and usually takes place outdoors in a large field.  https://www.apps.akc.org/classic/events/lure_coursing/getting_started.cfmhttp://www.asfa.org/


  • Agility Training: Agility is a fast and very fun activity for all those hyper, athletic Border Collies and other busy breeds.  It is basically a competitive (although you can just do it for fun) obstacle course for dogs and they LOVE IT!  http://dogs.about.com/od/sportsrecreation/a/agility_training.htm


  • Flyball: This is fetch on steroids and another perfect activity for high energy breeds.  Dogs compete in teams of four where they race over four hurdles, catch a tennis ball launched from a box and then race back over the hurdles to their owner again!  http://flyballdogs.com/FAQ.html


  • Dock Dogs: Really…what could be more fun than watching a bunch of crazy, happy Labradors, and other water loving breeds jump as far as they can off the end of a dock and into the water after a dummy?  If one of them is your dog, all the better! Check it out at: http://www.dockdogs.com/.


  • Herding:  It is an amazing thing to see instinct kick in on a dog bred for herding. Who knew all that ankle biting actually had a purpose? If you own a Border Collie, Cattle Dog, Sheltie, or Collie breed you may want to check your area for a nearby club or demonstration  http://bccc.pair.com/getstart.html


  • Earth dogs: In a Lab and Border Collie world it’s nice to know that the terriers and Dachshunds of the world can get their “game on” through Earth dog competitions.  These little guys are born hunters and these competitions celebrate them.  Check them out.  It’s a good time and no-one gets hurt. http://www.akc.org/events/earthdog/index.cfm

  • Hiking/Camping: If you are interested in something that is not group oriented there is always this standby.  It’s great exercise for both of you.

Hopefully we got you thinking about something new to try with your dog. Here’s wishing you both a beautiful and lifelong partnership.

9 Ways to Help Your Pet Live Longer

  • Spay and neuter:

    • Spayed females have a greatly decreased risk of ovarian and breast cancer and zero chance of an infected uterus.  The earlier you spay, the greater the benefits.

    • Guess who gets hit by cars??  That’s right…intact males.  The urge to breed is strong and can put your Romeo in harm’s way.   Neutered males don’t develop testicular cancer either.

    • Every puppy that isn’t born makes the chance of a shelter pet finding a new home that much greater.

  • Good dental care makes for a longer life:

    • It’s a fact.  Bacteria from the mouth can harm the heart, kidney and liver.

    • Painful dental disease can lead to weight loss and poor body condition.

    • In people periodontal disease has been linked to poor control of Diabetes.

  • Preventative vaccines save lives:

    • Every year thousands of pets die from diseases such as Parvovirus and Distemper which can easily be prevented by a vaccine and let’s not forget Rabies which kills almost without exception.

  • Heartworm disease causes permanent damage to the heart:

    • Preventatives can save your dog or cat from the devastating effects of Heartworm disease.  Congestive heart failure, pulmonary clots with concurrent damage to the lungs, liver enlargement, weight loss and eventual death are all the results of untreated Heartworm disease.

    • In cats, just one or two worms can cause death.

  • Parasites rob your pet of more than just food:

    • Roundworms absorb nutrients, interfere with digestion and can damage the lining of your pet’s intestines.

    • Hookworms can cause anemia and severe diarrhea.  Small puppies can and do perish from Hookworm infestation.

    • Giardia and Coccidia cause diarrhea and poor body condition.

    • Fleas and ticks not only feed on your pet’s blood but also carry dangerous diseases such as Plague, Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain Spotted fever, Ehrlichia and Anaplasmosis.

  • Obesity kills:

    • Excess weight damages joints, the heart, liver and kidneys.  Many diseases such as diabetes are closely correlated to obesity.  Yes Virginia, you can love your pet to death.

  • Yearly blood profiles can spot problems before they become serious:

    • By the time many problems are visible through decreased activity or other behavior changes your pet may be very sick.  They can’t tell you that they don’t feel well but blood work can speak for them.

    • Blood work can catch changes in body systems early in the disease process before major damage has been done. The earlier we treat a disease such as diabetes or kidney failure, the better the chance to extend the quality and length of your pet’s life.

  • Obedience Training  Saves Lives:

  • Having a good “down” on your dog can save them from becoming a “Hit by Car” statistic.

  • Well behaved pets receive better medical care because we can examine them more closely.

  • Good manners make rehoming a pet much easier should the need ever arise.

  • Dogs that bite put themselves and others at risk of injury and death.